LEONIDAS A BOY OF THE AGOGE PDF

Leonidas of Sparta: A Boy of the Agoge, Book I in the Leonidas Trilogy, a biographical novel about the hero of Thermopylae. All about Leonidas of Sparta: A Boy of the Agoge by Helena P Schrader. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers. The smaller of twins, born long after two elder brothers, Leonidas was considered an afterthought from birth — even by his mother. Lucky not to be killed for being.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Leonidas of Sparta by Helena P. The smaller of twins, born long after two elder brothers, Leonidas was considered an afterthought from birth — even by his mother.

Lucky not to boyy killed for being undersized, he was not raised as a prince like his eldest brother, Cleomenes, who was heir to the throne, but instead had to endure the harsh upbringing of ordinary Spartan youth. Barefoot, always a little hung The smaller of twins, born long after two elder brothers, Leonidas was considered an afterthought from birth — even by his mother.

Leonidas of Sparta: A Boy of the Agoge – Helena P. Schrader – Google Books

Barefoot, always a little hungry, and subject to harsh discipline, Leonidas had to prove himself worthy of Spartan citizenship. Struggling to survive without disgrace, he never expected that one day he would be king or chosen to command the combined Greek forces fighting a Persian invasion. But these were formative years that would one day make him the most famous Spartan of them all: This is the first book in a trilogy of biographical novels about Leonidas of Sparta.

This first book describes his childhood in the infamous Spartan agoge.

Leonidas of Sparta: A Boy of the Agoge

The second will agogd on his years as an ordinary citizen, and the third will describe his reign and death. Paperbackpages. Published February 5th by Wheatmark first published January 1st Leonidas of Sparta Trilogy 1. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Leonidas of Spartaplease sign up. Lists with This Book. This first volume of Schrader’s trilogy on life of Spartan King Leonidas was enthralling from first page to last.

There’s not much on his life historically; the author tells us she has invented most of this Bildungsroman. It’s also a way for the author to explain different aspects of Spartan life. This particular novel concentrates on Leonidas’s school years in the agogefrom admission More like 4.

This particular novel concentrates on Leonidas’s school years in the agogefrom admission at 7 to full Spartan citizenship at Each chapter covers one full school year focusing on a major adventure and Leonidas’s growth from boy to man. Along with a poor but intelligent classmate for whom Leonidas pays tuition and other fees, Alkander, Leonidas’s other best friend, Prokles, is also a classmate, the latest generation leonidxs the author’s fictional Spartan family from other novels unrelated to this trilogy.

The pf boys are inseparable. Schrader’s done a marvelous job in painting a picture of ancient Sparta and her people.

Her characters were so lifelike and realistic I felt I got to know them. I haven’t read the other books in the trilogy yet, but I can see where the values inculcated in Leonidas’s childhood will influence the rest of his life.

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Outstanding were his phouxir or fox-time [part of the curriculum–period of time he was given a small knife and told to survive on his own in the wild] and, due to his own [he admits it] stupidity, kidnapping but loenidas rescue. As an eirenea young man on the verge of becoming a citizen, he supervises a group of teenage boys; this is his first taste of leadership.

This novel is most highly recommended. I have the other two sequels in hand to read. May 03, Helen Hollick rated it really liked it. This book has received a Discovering Diamonds Review: I thought I was going to be reading a fictional story about the legendary Leonidas.

What I got was a book that seemed to focus on education, culture, laws and the Spartan way of life. Leonidas was present, but at times he seemed almost an afterthought… Superfluous as his mother would say… When I finished, and being slightly dissatisfied, I decided to look at this book from a different point of view.

It flowed like a non-fiction book. It seemed to be mainly facts and figures with hardly any suspense, drama or humor. Every now and again there was a glimmer of something but then it vanished almost as quickly as it had appeared. At this point I remembered reading that Schrader had previously published four non-fiction books.

I realized that this would help explain the writing style. It is a solid book and I would classify it as an interesting read. She is also descriptive but, because of her writing style, her words tend to come across as if they belong in a college textbook or My only hope is that Leonidas plays a more exciting and interesting role in them… Reviewed in association with Rebecca’s Reads.

The death of Leonidas is legendary. His last days have inspired great works of art and popular enthusiasm. The stand of “the ” at Thermopylae has been harnessed to a hundred modern causes pitting East against West, and Leonidas with his Spartans have come to symbolize what is good and noble in war: But who was Leonidas? And what was he before he became the incarnation of Freedom fighting Tyranny?

Herodotus gives us some tantalizing t The death of Leonidas is legendary. Herodotus gives us some tantalizing tidbits — the story of his father’s forced second marriage, the tensions between his elder brothers, the precociousness of his wife. But he is silent on many other key points, from the date of Leonidas’ birth to his role in Sparta prior to becoming king later in life. Only one thing about his early life do we know for certain: Knowing that, knowing how he ended, and building ont he fascinating insights into his personality provided by the few sayings attributed him, I have created a young Leonidas.

Nothing in this novel contradicts known facts about Leonidas, but the novel is quite candidly fiction.

View all 4 comments. Apr 25, A. I really enjoyed this book in more ways than one. The aogge was compelling and interesting, the characters were multidimensional and believable,the pace wgoge exciting, and the history lessons and finally z truth about the real Sparta abundant! The author does a wonderful job creating the character of young Leonidas and following him as he develops into a young man is very entertaining.

I highly recommend this to those who enjoy historical fiction with real historical information of the highest voy I really enjoyed this book in more ways than one. I highly recommend this to those who enjoy historical fiction with real historical information of the highest quality.

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I will be ordering the rest of the series shortly. It is obvious that the author knows the area very well and can describe it in minute details. However, for someone who has never been there a map would have been very helpful. With so many names of areas and rivers and mountains, my mind couldn’t envision it all-but of course that could be my own personal shortcoming.

Fantastic – couldn’t put it down!

A Boy of the Agoge, by Helena Schrader, is an excellent book that tells an excellent story about Leonidas of the Agiads of the modern day movie fame during his childhood.

Considering what historians and archeologists have discovered about that time and region, the author does a great job collecting and cobbling together a compelling story. Not only does she provide a story about a young Spartan prince that later becomes a king, but she tells his story in context during Leonidas of Sparta: Not only does she provide a story about a young Spartan prince that later becomes a king, but she tells his story in context during the years he transitions from a young boy into a citizen through the Spartan Agoge education process.

While this is a work of fiction, the story she tells really deserves more credit than that. It is not just a story about Leonidas, but also about life in Sparta and the people of that region in that time.

The book includes a list of characters within the front cover that lists the several relevant families and friends. The author notates which characters are real and which are supporting, fictional characters. The chapters split to cover progressing years classes in school. Both these sections explain what the Schrader is accomplishing by writing this book and contextualizing the timeline in the way she does.

I read a short review from someone who seemed to feel cheated that this was a fictional biography which the author explains as early as the first page. I challenge that reader to find any other book that tells a more thorough story about Leonidas that is any more accurate. The truth is that he lived so long ago, and such details simply are not available, so historians have to take the facts and build a story that does not make falsehoods out of those facts.

Schrader does a wonderful lf of making the story interesting and not overly dramatic. This storytelling deserves elonidas much credit if not more than those other works of art on the same character like I thoroughly enjoyed this book! The author did a great job telling a story that was easy to read and follow.

If you are interested in learning about a society that dates back years, this book if perfect! A Boy of the Agoge is the first book of a trilogy Schrader is writing about Leonidas. The author just recently published her next book, Leonidas of Sparta: A Peerless Thw, which continues the story. There is a perception that Sparta was nothing more than a society of mindless warriors.

This novel breaks the model and shows that archaic Spartan society was vibrant. Don’t get me wrong, the author does show how brutal the agoge the Spartan public education system could be. We have a story about the early years of the future King Leonidas.