FADE IN THE MAKING OF STAR TREK INSURRECTION PDF

FADE IN: From Idea to Final Draft. The Writing of. Star Trek: Insurrection by. Michael It’s clear Michael Piller wanted this book read, so we felt that making it. An inside look at the writing process of Star Trek: Insurrection. From concept to final film script. Sandra Piller just posted on Facebook, “I am so excited to announce the publication of my late husband Michael Piller’s book Fade In: The.

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Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Fade In by Michael Piller. The Writing of Star Trek: Insurrection by Michael Piller. Inwith the franchise basking in the success of First Contact, Star Trek producer Rick Berman called upon his old friend and colleague Michael Piller to write the next installment of the franchise. They began with the idea of making something lighter and more fun than the previous Next Generation films.

But the road from idea to finished film is a long one, fraught w Inwith the franchise basking in the success of First Contact, Star Trek producer Rick Berman called upon his old friend and colleague Michael Piller to write the next installment of the franchise.

But the road from idea to finished film is a long one, fraught with many perils, from meddling trk to recalcitrant actors.

Piller wrote this first hand account of the writing process before his death in Due to pressure from Paramount, it has never received an official publication, but the leaked manuscript is widely available online.

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Fade Inplease sign up. How many pages are in this book?

Fade In: The Making of Star Trek Insurrection | Memory Alpha | FANDOM powered by Wikia

See 1 question about Fade In…. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Apr 07, Dustin rated it liked it Shelves: An interesting look at the creation of a movie from the perspective of the writer. Being a fan of Star Trek it was a bit like watching sausage being made, because Michael Piller details the entire two year process of writing the movie, from his initial concept all the way through the last minute rewrite of the final action scene of the film.

Insurrection isn’t my favorite Trek film, but now I understand the why and how of what we got. If you’re interested in the process of screenwriting or b An interesting look at the creation of a movie from the perspective of the writer.

If you’re interested in the process of screenwriting or behind the scenes info I’d definitely look this book up. Apr 01, Dave Creek rated it really liked it.

It’s rare to find a book about a movie that did just middlin’ at the box office and isn’t one touted as a favorite by most people.

The late Michael Piller wrote such a book, though: He’s credited with bringing new life to the writing on TNG when he joined the show in its third season. With Piller insisting upon a new emphasis on character, the show took off creatively. I’ll leave the story of the many iterations of the script for you to discover in the book itself.

Piller’s concepts and eventual script passes through a lot of hands, including that of TREK head Rick Berman, plenty of Paramount studio people, and the movie’s two main stars, Patrick Stewart and Brent Spiner.

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Stewart is especially incisive in his criticisms of the early version of the script, revealing a deep understanding of story structure and of what a STAR TREK story should be.

Arriving after all: “Fade In: The Making of Star Trek Insurrection” by Michael Piller

TREK fans will enjoy this look behind the scenes, especially when Piller talks about his professional relationship with TREK overlord Berman, who has remained somewhat of a mystery man to fans. Other movie fans may appreciate the insight into franchise filmmaking.

It was never given a professional release, and given that ST: But now it seems I can’t find a link to it. I hope you have better luck. Apr 03, Adam rated it really liked it. Michael Piller describes the process of writing Star Trek: Though I have seen some people pan this book in their personal reviews because it is not a “tell-all” about the behind-the-scenes tensions and personality conflicts, or a mea culpa for why the film was not amazingly successful, I simply want to say this: Piller is refreshingly honest about the process of creation and change that goes into making a movie.

Writing anything, from a short story, nove Michael Piller describes the process of writing Star Trek: Writing anything, from a short story, novel, magazine article, doctoral dissertation, movie script, or a letter to the editor, is a long and difficult process in which you create something new that still has to fit within the bounds of the world around you.

Sometimes it has to fit page restrictions, or match someone else’s sensibilities, but if it is to go forward there have to be compromises. Michael Piller had to do just that. He had to create a story that satisfied the actors, producers, the studio, and the general public.

This is not an easy task. Did he do it perfectly? Insurrection was fun, but the story was a bit labored at times. Honestly, is everyone a computer science and engineering major in the twenty-fourth century?

Moreover, it is unfortunate that the movies make Riker, Troi, Crusher, LaForge, and Worf subsidiary characters to Data and Picard – but again, you have to satisfy the big names if the project is to advance. Piller un honestly, and gives the good with the bad. It is not self-congratulatory, but it is not self-deprecating either. He tells us how he fwde at the story, through many revisions and suggestions, sculpting the words into a final version.

I found it a fun and informative read. As for the movie? I will leave that for you to decide Oct 26, Brent rated thr did not like it. I haven’t read a book this bad in a long time.

I was lead to believe this book was an inside Hollywood story about how a movie became a disaster as maikng by the screenwriter.

I knew this book never got published too so I was hoping for a juicy tale that burned bridges with all involved in the film. I thought I would get some dirt on how satr artist working in the system got his work destroyed by an interfering studio, laying blame and spelling out what went wrong. Because Star Tr I haven’t read a book this bad in a long time. Insurrection, the tgek, is a train wreck.

Instead, the screenwriter seems to be under the impression that they made a fine film and simply details the changes made to every draft of the script. Jaking in agreement with the producer, director, and studio at every turn and there is no conflict or blame. It’s simply a boring account of how a terrible film got made, told as straight-forward as possible. View all 3 comments. Aug 13, Jared rated it sgar it. A fascinating insight into how “sausage is made” in Hollywood — unlike a TV show, where the demand for so much content is so high, the screenwriter seems to have no shortage of interference for a feature film, as Piller demonstrates as he discusses insurrectiin writing of Star Trek: Budgetary demands, focus groups, producers, actors, etc.

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Sadly, this book is more interesting than the actual movie ever was. Sep 27, Chris rated it it was amazing.

Fade In: The Making of Star Trek – Insurrection – TrekToday

Thought it took a bit of work to find on the web as this was never officially published. This was makjng interesting. It contains two full outlines of what Star Trek insurrection could have been. It also gives background info onto why changes were made.

Jan 31, Phillip rated it really liked it. I’ll be talking my review on an upcoming trek. Jun 01, Colin Whiteside rated it liked it. A competent and matter of fact documenting of the making of Star Trek IX from the writer’s point of view. Hardly revelatory but readable nonetheless. Feb 17, Alex Gregory rated it it was amazing. I remember when this book was first “leaked” to the internet, via a manuscript that showed up on Trek-related sites — and disappeared just as quickly, shut down by the braintrust at Paramount due to a perceived series of “slights” against them.

They needn’t have worried. The Making of Star Trek Insurrection is an honest and compelling work that gives equal weight to the views of both sides in the production of the film and shows that, for all the work that went into it, nothing could ha I remember when this book was first “leaked” to the internet, via a manuscript that showed up on Trek-related sites — and disappeared just as quickly, shut down by the braintrust at Paramount due to a perceived series of “slights” against them.

The Making of Star Trek Insurrection is an honest and compelling work that gives equal weight to the views of both sides in the production of the film and shows that, for all the work that went into it, nothing could have saved it after the elongated writing process.

Michael Piller’s work documents the various ideas that sprang up after the release of the critically-praised and commercially-successful First Contact. Desperate for another hit, writers at the studio lobbed idea after idea at the executives. The first half of the book documents these ideas in a series of script excerpts. Despite some compelling storylines Picard going rogue to stop his friend from Starfleet Academy, then resigning at the end to go lone wolf against other fringe elements with the crewa lot of it just sounded unfilmable and unsustainable given how continuity-heavy the franchise was at this point in its lifespan.

A number of unlikely suspects came out of the ether to help refocus the story.

“Fade In: The Writing of Star Trek Insurrection”

While Patrick Stewart has understandably kept discussion of Picard and the franchise in general at a minimum these days, makign fascinating to hear anecdotes about him relaying character moments that wouldn’t be faed sync with the current plot to both Piller and producer Rick Berman. He and Brent Spiner were fountains of knowledge who understood the appeal of their respective characters more than most, and it’s a joy to hear about them refocusing efforts to rewrite the script.

The most compelling aspect of the book is the studio notes that are written, sometimes verbatim, from Paramount executives.